"It’s kind of like a forced attitude change."

Because Gen Plus focuses on services for 50 plussers, I’m always drawn to media reports on the workplace. And a few days ago, The Globe and Mail, considered Canada’s leading source for news, published an excellent article by Virginia Galt, on the shifting views that are emerging on the work landscape.

For the full article, click on the link

What were the main points?

Well, first, the article highlighted a few significant Canadians who have started new careers after 65:

“65 means freedom to start a whole new career”

For a growing number of well-established Canadians, ”the retirement dream” involves work — and not just hobby jobs but substantial second careers. At 68, Canada’s new ambassador to the United States, Michael Wilson has been far too busy to even contemplate the prospect of traditional retirement — although he did schedule a ski vacation before taking up his new duties in Washington, D.C., this week.

The latter part of the article is what really interested me. The statistics and the temperature — which mirrors what is happening in the US, the UK, Australia and many other “aging population” countries around the world.

The temperature

Employers will eventually have no choice but to consider hiring retirees for some positions, says Prof. Armstrong-Stassen.

And employers will have to change their attitude because there will not be enough younger people to fill the void when the baby boomers start to retire, she says.

“It’s kind of like a forced attitude change.”

But Ms. Patten, as an HR executive, says attitudes towards older workers have already changed for the better. “There is a returning respect for the richness of experience.”

She ponders the question of whether Mr. Wilson, Mr. Purdy and Mr. Iacobucci are trend-setters in taking on substantial new challenges later in life.

“I think you’ll see much more of it,” Ms. Patten says.

At 60, Ms. Patten herself says she also has no intention of retiring.

“For some of us,” Ms. Patten adds, “traditional retirement is just not part of our DNA.”

The stats

62.5: THE AVERAGE RETIREMENT AGE IN CANADA, UP FROM 61 IN 2000.
7.8%: PERCENTAGE OF CANADIANS 65 AND OLDER WHO ARE CURRENTLY IN THE LABOUR FORCE.
75%: PERCENTAGE OF WELL-OFF WORKING CANADIANS 45 AND UP, WHO EXPECT TO WORK AFTER RETIREMENT.

SOURCE: STATISTICS CANADA, IPSOS-REID AND UNIVERSITY OF WINDSOR

2 thoughts on “"It’s kind of like a forced attitude change."

  1. Great blog – I think it’s important to engage older folks online. My mom’s 65 and she’s in the Philippines, and she’s a surfer! 🙂

  2. I agree with you completely. The more 50 plussers discover the world of blog, the more delighted they will be. The Boomer curiosity of the 60’s and 70’s and their zest for life is echoed in Gen Y (Echo Boomers!) Hope you mom stops in from time to time.

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